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Ensuring Euro-Atlantic Security

Debriefing MSC2017

in Army · Conflicts 2017 · Crisis 2017 · Culture · Economics 2017 · EN · Europe 2017 · History 2017 · Nation 2017 · Person 2017 · Politics 2017 · Skepticism 2017 · USA 2017 35 views / 6 comments

GEOMETR.IT  ecfr.eu

ECFR’s director Mark Leonard is meeting with Wolfgang Ischinger, the Chairman of the Munich Security Conference. Together they are debriefing a very unusual MSC where the whole idea of the West was at stake.

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2016. TOP- 10

Ах, декабристы! Не будите Герцена! — 01.01.2016

Не выходи из комнаты, не совершай ошибку — 01.01.2016

США. Как пропаганда прохрюкала $ 730млн — 11.01.2016

Чем я тебя породил, тем я тебя и убью! — 11.01.2016

1 — Румыны, революция, лозунги. Что толку? — 11.01.2016

Польша пыльно квохчет у ног потных клоунов — 12.01.2016

2 — Румыны, революция, лозунги. Что толку? — 12.01.2016

Германия. «Майн кампф» и арабо/немцы — 13.01.2016

Немец, сарказм: эта война становится дурой… — 19.01.2016

Фонд — схема обмана. Толковый рассказ эксперта — 19.01.2016

2017 

На ринге два Голиафа. Трамп против ЦРУ — 27.02.2017

Революция — вид удовлетворяемой похоти. Гиппиус. Дневники. Февраль 1917.  — 27.02.2017

Несговорчивый Трамп. Опять американские горки? — 27.02.2017

Пенсию нужно заработать, но дожить до 60 лет не просто.Свежа украинская мысль! — 27.02.2017

Европа — зад Запада. Мюнхен — 27.02.2017

Von-der-Leyen-Salven auf Trump — 27.02.2017

Noam Chomsky. Intellectuals and War -1 — 27.02.2017

Der Abschiebestaat — 27.02.2017

Pay no attention to the President? — 27.02.2017

Europe: ‘Too old for its own truths -1 — 27.02.2017

Trumps langer Schatten — 27.02.2017

GEOMETR.IT

A “European Union first” mantra

in Army · Conflicts 2017 · Crisis 2017 · Culture · Economics 2017 · EN · Europe 2017 · Geopolitics · History 2017 · Nation 2017 · Person 2017 · Politics 2017 · Skepticism 2017 · USA 2017 12 views / 5 comments

GEOMETR.IT  project-syndicate.org

The world needs the European Union now more than ever. Despite recent crises and the hard blow dealt by the Brexit vote, the EU may well be the world’s best line of defense against today’s most serious threats: isolationism, protectionism, nationalism, and extremism in all forms, all of which are once again growing in Europe and beyond. The key to enabling the EU to meet this potential – to save itself and the world from catastrophe – is for member states urgently to adopt a “European Union first” mantra.

Unlike the “America first” credo embraced by US President Donald Trump, such a mantra would not be an exercise in damaging unilateralism. On the contrary, it would compel member states’ governments to look beyond narrow national interest, defend openness and multilateralism, and confront head-on the exclusionary political forces that have lately been gaining ground. It would drive member states to consolidate the EU, thereby enabling it to overcome the challenges it faces and help preserve the international order.

That order is neither an inessential accessory nor a post-war relic. It has supported global prosperity and stability for 70 years. We need it – together with the multilateralism on which it is built – to confront many of the economic, environmental, and strategic challenges we now face, challenges that cannot be addressed at the national level.

A cornerstone of the existing international order is the recognition that maintaining peace and human welfare requires an understanding of and respect for the needs and interests of others – needs and interests that are no less legitimate than our own. Multilateralism is not a product of unsustainable solidarity, as some like to claim; it is the result of an enlightened interpretation of one’s own interests.

With a constructive attitude, even a large number of disparate actors can reach agreements in which everyone wins by yielding a little; without it, prospects for sustained peace and widely shared prosperity become far bleaker.

If all countries put their own interests first, paying no heed to others, competition will quickly overwhelm common interests. If nobody is ever willing to yield, we will all lose.

If we depend solely on bilateral deals, the shared spaces and synergies that facilitate agreement on difficult but vital topics – from climate change to security – will narrow until they disappear.

This is why Trump’s embrace of an American first mantra is so worrying. As the world’s leading power, the US sets the tone of cooperation and often provides the incentives for other countries to participate. If the US maintains a unilateral and isolationist stance, other countries are almost certain to follow suit, endangering everyone – including the US.

Recently, the Trump administration has begun to moderate some of its foreign-policy positions. In particular, Trump has finally agreed to honor the “One China” policy. He also seems to have rectified his approach to Japan, after having raised doubts about his willingness to follow through on America’s security commitments. These developments imply that the administration is beginning to recognize the need for a more constructive approach.

That recognition may arise partly out of an understanding of history. Experience has shown that the most effective way to prevent conflicts is through inclusion and cooperation. Exclusionary rhetoric plays into the hands of those who reduce identity to nativist definitions. When such figures – nationalists and populists – have been left to guide policy in the past, the result has been large-scale conflict.

At a time when global power dynamics are in flux, as is true today, the risk of such an outcome is even greater. Today, an effort is being made to incorporate emerging powers – particularly China – more deeply into the existing structures of global governance. Casting doubt on these structures, which have sustained stability over the last seven decades, would merely fuel more nationalism and competition, opening the way for volatility and conflict.

If the US cannot be counted on to support global stability, the EU’s model and experience will become even more important. The EU is the embodiment of inclusion, cooperation, and democratic values. Despite its flaws, the EU has proved time and again how differences can be resolved peacefully and constructively. Its member states are uniquely committed to multilateralism; indeed, we practice it daily.

The results speak for themselves. No one can doubt that the EU has been a guarantor of peace, democracy, modernity, and progress for all of its members. Its community model – which requires cooperation, negotiation, and compromise to reach any consequential decision – amounts to a check on extremism, because no member country can push radical policies forward without other members pushing back.

This is not to say that EU countries face no risk of falling victim to simplistic populist rhetoric. On the contrary, the point is to highlight why EU member states must dedicate themselves to the continued construction of a stronger and deeper union. For the sake of Europe and the world, it is time to put the EU first.

No one knows better than Europe the consequences of extremism and nationalism – or how to overcome them. With an enlightened and supranational spirit, the EU has achieved a sustained peace that would have seemed impossible a century ago. It must not lose sight of that achievement. Instead, it must continue to advance the union, and show the world what multilateralism can do.

https://www.project-syndicate.org

 

2. Europe. Not what it used to be

in Army · Crisis 2017 · Culture · Economics 2017 · EN · Europe 2017 · Geopolitics · History 2017 · Nation 2017 · Skepticism 2017 · USA 2017 13 views / 6 comments

GEOMETR.IT  neweasterneurope.eu

“We are living in the days where what we call liberal non-democracy – in which we lived for the past 20 years – ends, and we can return to real democracy,” said Viktor Orban, prime minister of Hungary, when congratulating Donald Trump on his victory in the United States presidential election.One hundred days have passed since the so-called “big bang”. While some are celebrating, the Left is mourning the defeat of liberalism and the countries that might be left without America’s support. However, it is the EU, not America, that faces the real crisis.

Among those foreigners were quite a few Georgians and Lithuanians, as their countries experienced a similar transitional period in the early 2000s and late 90s, respectively. “50 years of Sovietisation cannot be undone overnight and few here realise what a challenge meeting the EU acquis will be. Least progress has been made in the battle against organised and economic crime and corruption. This is a crucial area, without which many other reforms will mean little.” This might sound like something commentators today would say when referring to Ukraine. However, it is what Tom Macan, the British Ambassador to Lithuania, wrote in his Annual Review for 1997, acquired by a Freedom of Information request.

Today Trump’s presidency poses a new kind of threat to stability in Ukraine and the EU. Or at least that was the idea promoted by the left-wing press. Robert Brinkley, a former British Ambassador to Ukraine (2002-2006), says that Donald Trump “should be judged on his actions in office, rather than speculation about what he may or may not do.” He also doesn’t reject the positive scenario of Trump’s presidency. According to Brinkley, Vladimir Putin might be more likely to negotiate issues regarding Ukraine with Trump than he would otherwise do with Obama.

Nostalgic Europe

Finally, there is a broader picture. The same disappointment that some Ukrainians feel is coming out in the form of radicalism and apathy in other countries of the “European Empire”.

Peter Pomerantsev, a Soviet-born British journalist and an expert on Russian propaganda, blames the wave of nationalism and disappointment in Eastern and Central Europe not on populism but on the feeling of nostalgia. “They are nostalgic of the time when they knew what was happening. When they had goals: to become independent, to join the EU, to join NATO. Now they are in. What’s their goal now?” he says.

“Timid, deluded and divided, Europe’s different entities are facing disaster. Yet the European ruling elites have missed countless chances to avert it. And they are so convinced of their own rightness, and of their right to rule, that they show no sign of changing course – or of listening to the rumble of the approaching tumbrils,” writes Edward Lucas, journalist and author of The New Cold War.

This loss of hope and stamina described by Pomerantsev and Lucas is what Aleksei Tsimbalyuk was talking about. Poroshenko might stick to his plans to apply for EU membership in 2020, but halfway through his first term as president he lost the trust of his nation. Very symbolic, as the EU itself seems to be losing its most loyal members.

Is this the end? 

However, as the Eastern European proverb goes: “Smoke in your own country is purer than fire in a foreign land.” Maybe that is why the EU’s eyes are on the top players of the Union in times of unrest. The EU leaders will discuss the future of its member states this month, but countries such as Ukraine might remain in the past. Ukraine is patiently waiting between the borders of two powers that are rapidly becoming more vulnerable than ever before. Tsimbalyuk draws the conclusion: “The idea of the European Union that is united is dead. And it’s not nationalists or separatists that killed it, but the European leaders who were never leading by example.” Maybe just another crisis can unite the Union.

Agne Dovydaityte is a freelance journalist and a third year Journalism student at City, University of London. She specialises in Eastern European issues

http://www.neweasterneurope.eu

GEOMETR.IT

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Откровения матёрого спекулянта. Bill Gross

Михаил Родзянко — «гофмейстер» Февральской революции

Величие поляка после его похода в отхожее место. Министр

2 — Auf Augenhöhe

Europe. Not what it used to be

2.Trump, Russland, BND und Orwell — Das große Interview

WHAT HAPPENED AT THE MUNICH SECURITY CONFERENCE 2017?

NATO – zły sen

1. Europe. Not what it used to be

in Conflicts 2017 · Crisis 2017 · Economics 2017 · EN · Europe 2017 · Geopolitics · History 2017 · Nation 2017 · Person 2017 · Skepticism 2017 · USA 2017 41 views / 7 comments

GEOMETR.IT   neweasterneurope.eu

“We are living in the days where what we call liberal non-democracy – in which we lived for the past 20 years – ends, and we can return to real democracy,” said Viktor Orban, prime minister of Hungary, when congratulating Donald Trump on his victory in the United States presidential election.One hundred days have passed since the so-called “big bang”. While some are celebrating, the Left is mourning the defeat of liberalism and the countries that might be left without America’s support. However, it is the EU, not America, that faces the real crisis.

Ukraine’s destiny as part of US relations with Russia was one of the major talking points of the US election last year. Ukraine, however, does not look as far as America. More than three years ago, protesters in Maidan Square in Kyiv were waving EU flags. Further integration into the Union still remains the government’s target, but many Ukrainians are disappointed and disillusioned by the European elites.

This March, the leaders of 27 EU countries will meet in Rome to decide on the further development and future vision of the EU. Although the unrest in Eastern Ukraine and Crimea continues, it might seem that Ukraine has long left the agenda of the EU. The country whose name translates to “borderland” or “country on the edge“ keeps being pushed further and further away. Is it really just Russia that is to blame?

Disillusioned Ukraine 

“A strong Ukraine is wanted neither by the EU nor by Russia,”says Aleksei Tsimbalyuk. He is just one of the many who are disillusioned and disappointed by the post-revolutionary situation. A few years ago Alexei was still a deacon in the Orthodox Church. Today he is wearing camouflagefatigues. “When your country is in danger, everyone needs to defend what is given by God,” he says.

Although Ukraine is being praised for its reforms in the judicial area, Aleksei does not believe that the government is making progress. “Reforms, as such, there are none. Everything is superficial. Everyone is stealing. The IMF and the EU allow that to happen by giving money to corrupt politicians. The only way the EU could help my country is by refusing to provide any credit to our government until real reforms actually begin,” he continues.

Aleksei is from Odesa – a town famous for its trade port and corruption.In front of the camera, Ukraine’s President Petro Poroshenko often talks about tackling corruption. “50 minutes later [he] discusses a new scheme for the Odesa Port Plant or Tsentrenergo [State energy generation company]. For him ambition means becoming Ukraine’s number one oligarch, not a reformer president,” writes Ukrainian journalist Sergii Leshchenko for OpenDemocracy.

Mikheil Saakashvili, a former president of Georgia, resigned as governor of Odesa last year, citing widespread corruption within Poroshenko’s government.

Aivaras Abromavicius, the Ukrainian economy minister, also stepped down. The economic reformer left saying that he did not want to act as a “smoke screen” for corruption. In an interview with New Eastern Europe he said: “The reason for the slow reforms is political elites. Maidan has failed to change political elites who remain backward and unable to deal with the challenges that Ukraine faces.”

He said that the EU supported Ukraine a lot throughout these two years of reforms, but “more support is needed”. And the support should be with “strict conditionality”, rather than just “blind investments” in a country with high levels of corruption.

However, Alexander J. Motyl, a political scientist at Rutgers University, thinks that it is not the corruption itself but rather the “western corruption fetish” that stops the reforms from happening.“It’s a mistake to think that countries can advance only if corruption is completely eliminated, or that corruption can only be eliminated by arresting corrupt officials. The best way is by changing the structure of incentives. Unfortunately, it isn’t sensational and, thus, can be easily ignored by the press,” he says.

Motyl suggests that the fact that Ukraine rarely appears in the Western press gives freedom to populists in the country to flourish. “They can now make outlandish demands without having to pay the price of bad press in the West,” he says.

The situation was once different. Motyl says that many Ukrainians saw the war with Russia as a defence of Europe and their idea of being European. “In turn, Europe is dragging its feet, rejecting Ukraine, flirting with or appeasing Russia, and seemingly ignoring Ukraine’s good-faith efforts to ‘join’,” he continues.

Re-thinking the EU and the West

Just before the New Year, Ukrainians had a hope that the EU will finally reward them with visa-free travel. Although Ukraine met all the requirements more than a year ago, the final decision is still on hold. Mykola Tochytskyi, Ukrainian representative to the EU, says that a prompt decision on visas is crucial to restore faith in the Union, and stop growing Euroscepticism. “We have met all the benchmarks. Now it’s time for the EU to deliver on its own commitments, ” he says.

Arnoldas Pranckevicius, a Lithuanian-born former adviser to the president of the European Parliament and head of the Representation of the European Commission in Vilnius, agrees that the EU is desperate for change, and needs to be reminded of its promises. “I wouldn’t call this the period of reforms or challenges for the EU, but rather the period of definitions. The EU project needs to restore the trust in its institutions and define its goals,” he stated.

A couple of years ago Ukraine was the main area of disagreement between Russia and the EU. Although the West maintains its economic sanctions towards the Kremlin, the EU is holding back from Ukrainian domestic politics. “We need to change our strategies in transitional countries. Strong institutions that can’t be corrupted by single individuals, rather than individual politicians that disappointed us a number of times, will be our new target,” says Pranckevicius.

This stands out as a very important statement and change in the political mood that came after the recent resignations. Before the waveof departures, foreign politicians in Ukraine were openly welcomed by EU officials.

Among those foreigners were quite a few Georgians and Lithuanians, as their countries experienced a similar transitional period in the early 2000s and late 90s, respectively. “50 years of Sovietisation cannot be undone overnight and few here realise what a challenge meeting the EU acquis will be. Least progress has been made in the battle against organised and economic crime and corruption. This is a crucial area, without which many other reforms will mean little.” This might sound like something commentators today would say when referring to Ukraine. However, it is what Tom Macan, the British Ambassador to Lithuania, wrote in his Annual Review for 1997, acquired by a Freedom of Information request.

Today Trump’s presidency poses a new kind of threat to stability in Ukraine and the EU. Or at least that was the idea promoted by the left-wing press. Robert Brinkley, a former British Ambassador to Ukraine (2002-2006), says that Donald Trump “should be judged on his actions in office, rather than speculation about what he may or may not do.” He also doesn’t reject the positive scenario of Trump’s presidency. According to Brinkley, Vladimir Putin might be more likely to negotiate issues regarding Ukraine with Trump than he would otherwise do with Obama.

Agne Dovydaityte is a freelance journalist and a third year Journalism student at City, University of London. She specialises in Eastern European issues.

http://www.neweasterneurope.eu

GEOMETR.IT

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Польша — гнилой скотомогильник. Прощай, подмытая Европа!

Февраль1917. Революция просто не могла не состояться

Дональд Трамп и признаки ФИНАНСОВОГО ПСОРИАЗА Америки

Confession of a self-professed EU nerd

Trump, Russland, BND und Orwell — Das große Interview —1

Die USA rüsten die NATO aus — GEGENREAKTION Europas

Nacisk na członków NATO

Auf Augenhöhe

2. WHAT HAPPENED AT THE MUNICH SECURITY CONFERENCE 2017?

in Conflicts 2017 · Crisis 2017 · Culture · Economics 2017 · EN · Europe 2017 · Geopolitics · History 2017 · Nation 2017 · Person 2017 · Skepticism 2017 · USA 2017 46 views / 5 comments

GEOMETR.IT  securityconference.de

«Russia seeks pragmatic US ties and ‘post-West’ world order» (David Rising and Geir Moulson, Washington Post/AP, 18 February): «Russia wants pragmatic relations with the United States but also is hoping for the creation of a ‘post-West world order,’ the country’s foreign minister said Saturday. Sergey Lavrov’s comments at the Munich Security Conference came hours after Vice President Mike Pence told the gathering that the U.S. will ‘hold Russia accountable’ even as the Trump administration searches for common ground with Moscow.»

«Mike Pence tells European leaders US will be ‘unwavering’ in commitment to Nato» (May Bulman, Independent, 18 February): «Vice President Mike Pence has told European leaders the US will be ‘unwavering’ in its commitment to the Nato alliance. Speaking at the Munich Security Conference in his first major policy address, Mr Pence said the Trump administration ‘strongly supports’ the international military organisation, despite Donald Trump having formerly described the alliance as ‘obsolete’. In an effort to reassure European leaders over Mr Trump’s alleged closeness with the Russian government, Mr Pence also said the US would ‘hold Russia accountable’ over the Ukraine crisis, even as the President seeks «new common ground» with Vladimir Putin’s administration.»

«Mike Pence Says U.S. Backs NATO but Urges Europe to Boost Military Spending» (Anton Troianovski and Julian E. Barnes, Wall Street Journal, 18 February): «Vice President Mike Pence said the U.S. would be unwavering in its commitment to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, but demanded that Europe step up its military spending, marking one of the Trump administration’s most full-throated efforts yet to reassure nervous partners.»

«German defense chief hits Trump attitudes on torture, Russia and Muslims» (Michael Birnbaum and Dan Lamothe, Washington Post, 17 February): «Germany’s defense chief on Friday hit President Trump’s dismissive attitude toward Washington’s European allies, giving a frosty reception to U.S. envoys at the largest ­conclave of U.S. and European officials since the inauguration. Speaking to a packed hall that included Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and Homeland Security Secretary John F. Kelly, German Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen hammered Trump’s ­attitudes toward Russia without ever mentioning the U.S. leader by name. ‘There can be no policy of equidistance between allies on one side and those who on the other question our borders, our values and the principles of ­international law,’ von der Leyen said to applause at the Munich Security Conference, where ­Europe’s senior security leaders were gathering to figure out how to respond to Trump.»

 

«Trump’s team in disarray, U.S. Senator McCain tells Europe» (Phil Stewart und Robin Emmott, Reuters, 17 February): «Republican Senator John McCain broke with the reassuring message that U.S. officials visiting Germany have sought to convey on their debut trip to Europe, saying on Friday that the administration of President Donald Trump was in ‘disarray’. McCain, a known Trump critic, told the Munich Security Conference that the resignation of the new president’s security adviser Michael Flynn over his contacts with Russia reflected deep problems in Washington. ‘I think that the Flynn issue obviously is something that shows that in many respects this administration is in disarray and they’ve got a lot of work to do,’ said McCain, even as he praised Trump’s defense secretary.»

«Munich Security Conference opens amid transatlantic uncertainties» (Xinhua, 17 February): «The Munich Security Conference (MSC) officially opened Friday as an array of global security issues ranging from the future of the transatlantic alliance to the West-Russia relations are in the spotlight. This year’s MSC, scheduled for three days, will see over 500 decision-makers and participants in the realm of international security from the world debating critical security challenges. German Minister of Defence, Ursula von der Leyen, said in her opening statement at the MSC that the Europe’s open societies and way of life are targeted by sphere-of-influence politics as well as disinformation.»

«Trump Aides Try to Reassure Europe, but Many Are Wary» (Helene Cooper, New York Times, 17 February): «The skepticism over who is in charge in Washington was crystallized on Friday at an annual meeting of dignitaries in Munich for a yearly security conference. Germany’s defense minister, Ursula von der Leyen, caused ripples when she pointedly expressed appreciation for the American ‘secretary of defense’s strong commitment to NATO.'»

«Defence secretary praises Nato and says security of both regions is tied» (Sam Jones and Stefan Wagstyl, FT, 17 February): «Senior cabinet figures from President Donald Trump’s administration attempted to reassure anxious allies on a foray into the heart of Europe on Friday, capping a week of diplomatic efforts to reaffirm Washington’s foreign policy priorities. James Mattis, the US defence secretary, heaped praise on an «enduring transatlantic bond» and told an annual security conference in Munich that Nato had the «full support» of the US president.»

«No to US troops in Syria, nuclear deal to stay, Iran’s foreign minister says» (Hilary Clarke and Christiane Amanpour, CNN, 17 February): «‘Speaking on the sidelines of the Munich Security Conference, Zarif said there was an international consensus not to let the agreement — which took two years to negotiate — unravel. ‘I believe everybody, including experts in the United States, know this was the best deal possible for all concerned, not just Iran but the US too,’ he said. ‘It was a triumph of diplomacy over coercion, because coercion doesn’t work any more.'»

«‘Europe has to do more’ to fund Nato» (BBC, 17 February): «US Vice-President Mike Pence is leading an American delegation to the Munich Security Conference this weekend. Officials from around the world will be looking for clues into how President Trump’s «America First» policy will affect international diplomacy, and the future of institutions such as Nato.»

«John McCain just systematically dismantled Donald Trump’s entire worldview» (Aaron Blake, Washington Post, 17 February): «During a speech at the Munich Security Conference in Germany, the Republican senator from Arizona delivered a pointed and striking point-by-point takedown of Trump’s worldview and brand of nationalism. McCain didn’t mention Trump’s name once, but he didn’t have to. And even considering the two men’s up-and-down history and the terrible things Trump has said about McCain, it was a striking display from a senior leader of a party when it comes to a president of the same party. In his speech, McCain suggested the Western world is uniquely imperiled this year — even more so than when Barack Obama was president — and proceeded to question whether it will even survive.»

«A Cracking Debate on the EU’s Future» (Judy Dempsy, Carnegie Europe, 17 February): «The title could have been a complete turn off: «The Future of the European Union: United or Divided?» But once the four panelists took to the podium for the first debate at this year’s Munich Security Conference, the fireworks began.»

«Eight facts about the Munich Security Conference» (Matthias von Hein, Deutsche Welle, 17 February): «What makes the Munich Security Conference so important? It is a unique global platform for the international elite to discuss security policy. There is virtually no other forum where so many government representatives — even enemies — and security experts come together in one small space. In its latest ranking, the University of Pennsylvania in the US, has, for the fourth time in a row, named it the «Best Think Tank Conference» in the world. Its importance lies not only in the program that is on offer. Many value the opportunity to meet with political players as far more important. They have the chance to informally exchange information and ideas in corridors and rooms, to get to know each other, sound out positions and, if needs be, draw a red line.»

«At the Munich Security Conference, we should seek to agree that development without security is unsustainable» (Bono, Independent, 17 February): «If your eyes roll at international gatherings like the G20 Foreign Ministers’ Summit this week in Bonn or the Security Conference I’ll be attending this weekend in Munich, let me confess, mine used to as well. But after nearly two decades of harassing and attending such gatherings, I’ve discovered the dirty little secret of these events is that they’re often not just talking shops.»

«5 things to watch out for at this year’s Munich Security Conference» (Janosch Delcker, Politico, 17 February): «This weekend, the German chancellor, the U.S. vice president and dozens of foreign and defense ministers will mingle with other political big shots at the grandiose Bayerischer Hof hotel in the Bavarian capital. Just another year at the Munich Security Conference? Not really. For much of its history stretching back more than 50 years, the annual conference — once dubbed a «transatlantic family gathering» for NATO member states — was where the West met to discuss the rest of the world. This year, relations between the U.S. and Europe, and among European states, are at the center of discussion.»

«Munich Security Conference to stress the value of Europe» (Richard A. Fuchs, Deutsche Welle, 16 February): «Trump, Brexit, EU and NATO crises – international politics are currently being turned on their head. All eyes are now on the Munich Security Conference, where US Vice President Mike Pence is expected to arrive on Friday. […] 47 foreign ministers, 30 defense ministers and 90 parliamentarians are due to attend. The presidents of Ukraine and Poland are already there, as is the new Secretary General of the UN, the EU’s High Representative for Foreign Policy, and the NATO General Secretary. […] At the kick-off event in Berlin on Monday, the organizers also presented the Munich Security Report 2017, entitled «Post-Truth, Post-West, Post-Order?» The authors link the development of anti-globalization movements with data about growing inequality in Western societies, as well as with increasing skepticism about Muslim immigration and a general loss of confidence in democratic institutions.»

«Tillerson, Dunford to meet with Russian counterpart» (Laura Koran and Ryan Browne, CNN, 15 February): «European diplomats are watching the new US officials all the more closely after Trump’s disparagement of NATO and questions about the utility of sanctions. Similarly, Western military officials are closely following Defense Secretary James Mattis’ participation in the NATO ministerial meeting in Brussels and Munich Security Conference this week as well.»

«Why Europe is warning of Pax Americana’s end» (Leonid Bershidsky, Bloomberg, 13 February): «Last year, the global security establishment was mildly worried about a growing U.S. disengagement overseas. This year, the worry has given way to a realization that the «liberal world order» – another name for Pax Americana – may be finished, and that new security arrangements are needed. That’s the conclusion that can be drawn from this year’s edition of the Munich Security Report, an agenda-setting document put out annually by the organizers of the Munich Security Conference, the world’s most prestigious geopolitical gathering.»

«Trump’s top defense and homeland officials to attend Munich Security Conference» (Reuters, 25 January): «U.S. Secretary of Defense James Mattis and Homeland Security chief John Kelly will attend the Munich Security Conference in February, and the event’s organizers said on Wednesday they expect other senior U.S. officials to attend also. […] Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov will participate, as well as Sigmar Gabriel, who will take over as German foreign minister on Friday. Many business leaders, defense and foreign ministers, lawmakers and representatives of non-governmental organizations such as Human Rights Watch also take part.»

https://www.securityconference.de

GEOMETR.IT

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Польша — гнилой скотомогильник. Прощай, подмытая Европа!

Февраль1917. Революция просто не могла не состояться

Дональд Трамп и признаки ФИНАНСОВОГО ПСОРИАЗА Америки

Confession of a self-professed EU nerd

Trump, Russland, BND und Orwell — Das große Interview —1

Die USA rüsten die NATO aus — GEGENREAKTION Europas

Nacisk na członków NATO

Auf Augenhöhe

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